Quick Tips: Time Dimension with Time Bands at Seconds Granularity in Power BI and SSAS Tabular

Time Dimension with Time Bands at Seconds Granularity in Power BI and SSAS Tabular

I wrote some other posts on this topic in the past, you can find them here and here. In the first post I explain how to create “Time” dimension with time bands at minutes granularity. Then one of my customers required the “Time” dimension at seconds granularity which encouraged me to write the second blogpost. In the second blogpost though I didn’t do time bands, so here I am, writing the third post which is a variation of the second post supporting time bands of 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 45 min and 60 min while the grain of the “Time” dimension is down to second. in this quick post I jump directly to the point and show you how to generate the “Time” dimension in three different ways, using T-SQL in SQL Server, using Power Query (M) and DAX. Here it is then:

Time Dimension at Second Grain with Power Query (M) Supporting Time Bands:

Copy/paste the code below in Query Editor’s Advanced Editor to generate Time dimension in Power Query:

let
Source = Table.FromList({1..86400}, Splitter.SplitByNothing()),
    #"Renamed Columns" = Table.RenameColumns(Source,{{"Column1", "ID"}}),
    #"Time Column Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Renamed Columns", "Time", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0,0,0,[ID]))),
    #"Hour Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Time Column Added", "Hour", each Time.Hour([Time])),
    #"Minute Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Hour Added", "Minute", each Time.Minute([Time])),
    #"5 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Minute Added", "5 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/5) * 5, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 5, 0)),
    #"15 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"5 Min Band Added", "15 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/15) * 15, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 15, 0)),
    #"30 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"15 Min Band Added", "30 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/30) * 30, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 30, 0)),
    #"45 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"30 Min Band Added", "45 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/45) * 45, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 45, 0)),
    #"60 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"45 Min Band Added", "60 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/60) * 60, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 60, 0)),
    #"Removed Other Columns" = Table.SelectColumns(#"60 Min Band Added",{"Time", "Hour", "Minute", "5 Min Band", "15 Min Band", "30 Min Band", "45 Min Band", "60 Min Band"}),
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Removed Other Columns",{{"Time", type time}, {"Hour", Int64.Type}, {"Minute", Int64.Type}, {"5 Min Band", type time}, {"15 Min Band", type time}, {"30 Min Band", type time}, {"45 Min Band", type time}, {"60 Min Band", type time}})
in
#"Changed Type"
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Quick Tips: Export Power BI Desktop and Power BI Service Model Data In One Shot with DAX Studio

Exporting Model Data to CSV 
or SQL Server in One Shot

In some of my old posts, which are most popular ones, I explained how to Export data Power BI Desktop or Power BI Service data to different destinations like CSV, Excel and SQL Server. In this quick tip I explain a very easy way to export the model data as a whole to either CSV or SQL Server with DAX Studio.

Daniil from XXL BI well explained this method, but I’d rather quickly explain how it works and add some more information.

After release 2.8 of DAX Studio, you can now quickly export the whole model to CSV and SQL Server in one shot.

Enabling Export All Data in DAX Studio

  • Open DAX Studio
  • Click “File”
  • Click “Options”
  • Click “Advanced”
  • Tick “Show Export All Data button”
DAX Studio Export Power BI Model Data Settings

Export Power BI Model Data to CSV

DAX Studio Export Power BI Model Data to CSV
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Definitive Guide to Implement On-premises Data Gateway (Enterprise Mode) in Organisations

Definitive Guide to On-premises Data Gateway Implementation
Photo credit: Kayla Duhon

If you are a Business Intelligence consultant working in Power Platform, Azure Logic Apps and Azure Analysis Services landscape, you probably felt that On-premises Data Gateway is one of the essential parts of your engagements with the your customers. Installing On-premises Data Gateway can go smoothly if you already have a well thought implementation plan otherwise, it can quickly turn to a beast if you don’t have one. In this post I do my best to provide you some guidelines that can help you with your On-premises Data Gateway implementation planning. Consider the following points before, during and after the engagement:

  • Understanding Usage
  • Culture of Engagement
  • Environments (with all peopleinvolved)
  • Communication
  • Security
    • Corporate/environmental firewalls
    • Proxy Servers
    • Identity Access Management
  • People
  • Documentation/Implementation Plan
  • Installation, Configuration and Testing

Here is a diagram of important point that you should consider:

Definitive Guide to Implement On-premises Data Gateway (Enterprise Mode)

Usage

You need to understand the use of On-premises Data Gateway for your customer. If they need the gateway for their Power Platform, Azure Logic Apps, Azure Analysis Services or all of them. This is important as you either need to have access to your customer’s Power BI Service or Azure Portal or both, or you need to assist your customer to configure On-premises Data Gateway in Azure or in Power BI Service. The next points are:

  • Accessing customer’s Azure Portal and/or Power BI Service: The customer to decide whether to create a new account with sufficient rights for you or give you the credentials of an existing account. It is important to make sure you can access all environments and you have necessary rights to install/configure the gateway
  • You assist/consult a person at customer side with the implementation: you need to make sure you communicate with that person and see if he/she understands the requirements before the implementation date. Send them a calendar invitation beforehand to make sure he/she is present at that date. Always ask for a backup person just in case of an emergency happening to the primary person.
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Time Dimension in Power BI and SSAS Tabular Model Supporting Minutes Time Bands

2018-05-23 12_58_48-Symbols (Open in Visio).vsdx - Visio Professional

Date dimension has been discussed quite a lot on the Internet and you can find lots of valuable articles around it here and there. But what if you need to analyse your data in time level? A customer has a requirement to analyse their data in Minutes level. This means that the granularity of the fact table would be at minute level. So, if they store the data in their transactional database in seconds level, then we need to aggregate that data to minutes level. I don’t want to go there, just bear in mind that the granularity of your fact table is something that you must think about at the very first steps. In most cases, if not all cases, you’d be better to have a separate Time dimension. Then you need to have a TimeID or Time column in your fact table to be able to create a relationship between the Time dimension and the fact table. In this post I show you two ways to create Time dimension in Power BI:

  • Creating Time dimension with DAX
  • Creating Time dimension with Power Query (M)

Alternatively, you can take care of the Time dimension in the source system like SQL Server. Continue reading and you’ll find a T-SQL codes as complementary.

The techniques that I explain here can be done in SSAS Tabular model and Azure Analysis Services as well.

Requirements:

To follow the steps of building the test model you need to have:

  • Power BI Desktop: Download the latest version from here
  • A sample fact table containing time or datetime. I modified FactInternetSales from AdventureWorksDW and made it available for you to download in Excel format (find the download link at the bottom of the post)

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