Quick Tips: Export Power BI Desktop and Power BI Service Model Data In One Shot with DAX Studio

Exporting Model Data to CSV 
or SQL Server in One Shot

In some of my old posts, which are most popular ones, I explained how to Export data Power BI Desktop or Power BI Service data to different destinations like CSV, Excel and SQL Server. In this quick tip I explain a very easy way to export the model data as a whole to either CSV or SQL Server with DAX Studio.

Daniil from XXL BI well explained this method, but I’d rather quickly explain how it works and add some more information.

After release 2.8 of DAX Studio, you can now quickly export the whole model to CSV and SQL Server in one shot.

Enabling Export All Data in DAX Studio

  • Open DAX Studio
  • Click “File”
  • Click “Options”
  • Click “Advanced”
  • Tick “Show Export All Data button”
DAX Studio Export Power BI Model Data Settings

Export Power BI Model Data to CSV

DAX Studio Export Power BI Model Data to CSV
Continue reading “Quick Tips: Export Power BI Desktop and Power BI Service Model Data In One Shot with DAX Studio”

What Does XMLA Endpoints Mean for Power BI and How to Test it for Free?

Test Environment from Power BI XMLA Endpoint

XMLA endpoint connectivity for public preview has been announced late March 2019. As at today, it is only available for Power BI Premium capacity users. This sounds like a massive restriction to a lot of people who don’t have a Premium capacity, but they’d love to see how it works. In this article I show you an easy way to get your hands to Power BI XMLA endpoint as quick as possible. Before I start, I’d like to simply explain what XMLA endpoint is and what it really means for Power BI users.

Power BI is Like Onion! It has layers!

Generally speaking, Power BI has two different layers, presentation layer and data model layer. Presentation layer is the visual layer, the one you make all those compelling reports and visualisations. The data model as the name resembles, is the layer that you make your data model in. This layer is the one you can access it via XMLA connectivity.

In a Power BI Desktop file, you can see both layers:

Different layers of Power BI

How XMLA Relates to Different Layers in Power BI?

As you may have already guessed, XMLA is only related to the data model layer and it has nothing to do with the presentation layer. So you may connect to a data model, browse the data model, import data from the model to other platforms like Excel and so forth.

XMLA Is Not New!

Seriously? Yes, seriously. It is not new. It’s been around for many years and perhaps you’ve already used it zillions of times. Whenever you’re connecting to an instance of SQL Server Analysis Services, either Multidimensional or Tabular from any tools like SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS), Power BI Report Builder, Excel, Tableau, etc…, you’re using XMLA connectivity indeed.

Power BI is an Instance of SSAS Tabular

It is true. Power BI runs a local instance of SSAS Tabular model. So, whenever you open a Power BI Desktop file (PBIX), Power BI creates a local instance of SSAS Tabular model with a random local port number that can be accessed on your local machine only. When you close the file, the local instance of SSAS Tabular is shut down and its port number is released.

I first revealed the fact that you can connect to the underlying data model in Power BI Desktop from whole different range of tools like SSMS, SQL Server Profiler, Excel, etc… on Jun 2016. So, we indeed were using XMLA to connect to Power BI data models for a long time. We can even take a step further to import our Power BI data models into an instance of SSAS Tabular. In that sense, we are literally generating XMLA scripts from Power BI to create the same data model in SSAS Tabular. How cool is that?

Sooo… What is new then?

Continue reading “What Does XMLA Endpoints Mean for Power BI and How to Test it for Free?”

Automate Testing SSAS Tabular Models

Automate Testing SSAS Tabular

In real world SSAS Tabular projects, you need to run many different testing scenarios to prove your customer that the data in Tabular model is correct. If you are running a Tabular Model on top of a proper data warehouse then your life would be a bit easier than when you build your semantic model on top of an operational database. However it would be still a fairly time-consuming process to run many test cases on Tabular Model, then run similar tests on the data warehouse and compare the results. So your test cases always have two sides, one side is your source database that can be a data warehouse and the other side is the Tabular Model. There are many ways to test the system, you can browse your Tabular Model in Excel, connecting to your Data Warehouse in Excel and create pivot tables then compare the data coming from Tabular Model and the data coming from the Data Warehouse. But, for how many measures and dimensions you can do the above test in Excel?

The other way is to run DAX queries on Tabular Model side. If your source database is a SQL Server database, then you need to run T-SQL queries on the database side then match the results of both sides to prove the data in Tabular Model is correct.

In this post I’d like to share with you a way to automate the DAX queries to be run on a Tabular model.

Straight away, this is going to be a long post, so you can make or take a cup of coffee while enjoying your reading.

While I will not cover the other side, the source or the data warehouse side, it is worth to automate that part too as you can save heaps of times. I’m sure a similar process can be developed in SQL Server side, but, I leave that part for now. What I’m going to explain in this post is just one of many possible ways to generate and run DAX queries and store the results in SQL Server. Perhaps it is not perfect, but, it is a good starting point. If you have a better idea it would be great to share it with us in the comments section below this post.

Requirements

  • SQL Server Analysis Services Tabular 2016 and later (Compatibility Level 1200 and higher)
  • An instance of SQL Server
  • SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)

How does it work

What I’m going to explain is very simple. I want to generate and run DAX queries and capture the results. The first step is to get all measures and their relevant dimensions, then I slice all the measures by all relevant dimensions and get the results. At the end I capture and store the results in a SQL Server temp table. Let’s think about a simple scenario:

  • you have just one measure, [Internet Sales], from ‘Internet Sales’ table
  • The measure is related to just one dimension, “Date” dimension
  • The “Date” dimension has only four columns, Year, Month, Year-Month and Date
  • you want to slice [Internet Sales] by Year, Month, Year-Month and Date

So you need to write four DAX queries as below:

EVALUATE
SUMMARIZE(
    'Internet Sales'
    , Date'[Calendar Year]
    , "Internet Sales", [Internet Total Sales]
)
EVALUATE
SUMMARIZE(
   'Internet Sales'
   , 'Date'[Month Name]
   , "Internet Sales", [Internet Total Sales]
)
EVALUATE
SUMMARIZE(
    'Internet Sales'
   , 'Date'[Year-Month]
   , "Internet Sales", [Internet Total Sales]
)
EVALUATE
SUMMARIZE(
     'Internet Sales'
    , 'Date'[Date]
    , "Internet Sales", [Internet Total Sales]
)

It is easy isn’t it? But, wait. What if you have 10 measures related to 4 dimension and each dimension has 10 columns? That sounds laborious doesn’t it? Well, in real world scenarios you won’t slice all measures by all relevant dimensions, but, you still need to do a lot. What we are going to do is to generate and run the DAX queries and store the results in a table in SQL Server. How cool is that?

OK, this is how it works…

  • Creating a Linked Server for SSAS Tabular instance from SQL Server
  • Generating DAX queries using Tabular DMVs
  • Running the queries through Tabular model and getting/storing the results in a SQL Server temp table

Continue reading “Automate Testing SSAS Tabular Models”

Query Azure SQL Data Warehouse in SSMS and SSDT

Azure SQL Data Warehouse in SSMS and SSTD

A while ago I wrote a blog post about Azure SQL Data Warehouse and Power BI which I explained how to install a new instance of Azure SQL Data Warehouse and how to visualise your Azure SQL DW data in Power BI. In this post I explain how to query an Azure SQL DW in SSMS and Visual Studio.

Requirements

Querying Azure SQL Data Warehouse from Visual Studio

Prior the latest release of SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) 2016, the only available tool for querying an Azure SQL Data Warehouse was SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) for Visual Studio 2013 or 2015. Here is how you can use SSDT 2015 to query an Azure SQL Data Warehouse:

  • Open SQL Server Data Tools 2015
  • Click “SQL Object Explorer” from View menu

SQL Server Object Explorer Visual Studio

  • Click “Add SQL Server”

Add Server to SQL Server Object Explorer Visual Studio

Connect to Azure SQL Data Warehouse in SQL Server Object Explorer Visual Studio

  • Enter “Server Name”
  • If you don’t recall server name then open a web browser and log into Azure portal
  • Click “SQL databases”
  • Click any desired Azure SQL Data Warehouse you created before. Make sure the database is “Online”

Azure SQL Data Warehouse in Azure Portal

Continue reading “Query Azure SQL Data Warehouse in SSMS and SSDT”

Batch Index Rebuild without Using Cursor

Today I came across a cube processing performance issue with one of our clients. So I started a step-by-step troubleshooting including optimising named queries. In some cases the named queries were actually querying some SQL views from the source data warehouse.

After all, I created about 35 new indexes and I needed to justify that all of those indexes are really used. As I processed the faulty cube several times during my step-by-step troubleshooting process it seemed all of those indexes were used.

But, I knew that I created some indexes that covered by some of the new ones and those indexes won’t be used.

I needed to rebuild all the indexes, however, rebuilding all of those indexes from SSMS UI would be such a pain. So I needed to do a batch index rebuild.

So I googled and I’ve found some scripts which actually are doing the job, but, all of them were using cursors. Sadly, I hate cursors so they are the last item in my book. Indeed, I’ll never use cursors until it’s absolutely necessary and there is no other better choices.

Therefore, I decided to do it in my way and I wrote the following script. I thought I’d be happy to share it with you guys as it might help some of you as well.

declare @ix varchar(max), @tbl varchar(max), @counter int, @CustomIx Varchar(max)

declare @table table (id int, tbl varchar(max), ix varchar(max))

set @CustomIx = ‘YOUR_INDEX_NAME_STARS_WITH’ –Custom index name will be like MY_IX_***

insert into @table (id, tbl, ix)

SELECT   ROW_NUMBER() over (order by ix.[NAME]) id

           , OBJECT_NAME(ixstat.[OBJECT_ID]) AS [OBJECT NAME]

         , ix.[NAME] AS [INDEX NAME]

FROM     SYS.DM_DB_INDEX_USAGE_STATS AS ixstat

         INNER JOIN SYS.INDEXES AS ix

           ON ix.[OBJECT_ID] = ixstat.[OBJECT_ID]

              AND ix.INDEX_ID = ixstat.INDEX_ID

WHERE    OBJECTPROPERTY(ixstat.[OBJECT_ID],‘IsUserTable’) = 1

          and  ix.[NAME] like @CustomIx+‘%’

 

set @counter= (select max(id) from @table)

 

while @counter >=1

begin

    set @ix = (select ix from @table where id = @counter)

    set @tbl = (select tbl from @table where id = @counter)

    exec(‘ALTER INDEX ‘+@ix+‘ ON [dbo].[‘+@tbl+‘] REBUILD PARTITION = ALL ‘)

    print @tbl + ‘.’ +  @ix + ‘ Rebuild successful’

    set @counter-=1

end

Continue reading “Batch Index Rebuild without Using Cursor”