Quick Tips: Time Dimension with Time Bands at Seconds Granularity in Power BI and SSAS Tabular

Time Dimension with Time Bands at Seconds Granularity in Power BI and SSAS Tabular

I wrote some other posts on this topic in the past, you can find them here and here. In the first post I explain how to create “Time” dimension with time bands at minutes granularity. Then one of my customers required the “Time” dimension at seconds granularity which encouraged me to write the second blogpost. In the second blogpost though I didn’t do time bands, so here I am, writing the third post which is a variation of the second post supporting time bands of 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 45 min and 60 min while the grain of the “Time” dimension is down to second. in this quick post I jump directly to the point and show you how to generate the “Time” dimension in three different ways, using T-SQL in SQL Server, using Power Query (M) and DAX. Here it is then:

Time Dimension at Second Grain with Power Query (M) Supporting Time Bands:

Copy/paste the code below in Query Editor’s Advanced Editor to generate Time dimension in Power Query:

let
Source = Table.FromList({1..86400}, Splitter.SplitByNothing()),
    #"Renamed Columns" = Table.RenameColumns(Source,{{"Column1", "ID"}}),
    #"Time Column Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Renamed Columns", "Time", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0,0,0,[ID]))),
    #"Hour Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Time Column Added", "Hour", each Time.Hour([Time])),
    #"Minute Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Hour Added", "Minute", each Time.Minute([Time])),
    #"5 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"Minute Added", "5 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/5) * 5, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 5, 0)),
    #"15 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"5 Min Band Added", "15 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/15) * 15, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 15, 0)),
    #"30 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"15 Min Band Added", "30 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/30) * 30, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 30, 0)),
    #"45 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"30 Min Band Added", "45 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/45) * 45, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 45, 0)),
    #"60 Min Band Added" = Table.AddColumn(#"45 Min Band Added", "60 Min Band", each Time.From(#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) + #duration(0, 0, Number.RoundDown(Time.Minute([Time])/60) * 60, 0))  +  #duration(0, 0, 60, 0)),
    #"Removed Other Columns" = Table.SelectColumns(#"60 Min Band Added",{"Time", "Hour", "Minute", "5 Min Band", "15 Min Band", "30 Min Band", "45 Min Band", "60 Min Band"}),
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Removed Other Columns",{{"Time", type time}, {"Hour", Int64.Type}, {"Minute", Int64.Type}, {"5 Min Band", type time}, {"15 Min Band", type time}, {"30 Min Band", type time}, {"45 Min Band", type time}, {"60 Min Band", type time}})
in
#"Changed Type"
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Power BI Governance, Good Practices, Part 1: Multiple Environments, Data Source Certification and Documentation

Power BI Governance, Good Practices, Part 1: Multiple Environments, Data Source Certification and Documentation

Power BI is taking off, and it’s fast becoming the most popular business intelligence platform on the market. It’s easy to engage with and get professional results quickly, making it the perfect tool for organisations looking to beef up their BI prowess and make data driven decisions through-out the organisation.

Gartner 2020 Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms
Did you know that Gartner named Microsoft as the 2020 leader in their Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms?

In this post we’re going to look at three good practices for implementation and give you the tips you need to make sure you avoid common pitfalls so you are on the fast track to success with Power BI on your organisation.

1. Setup multiple environments

When working on a Power BI implementation project, it’s wise to have multiple environments to manage the lifecycle of your BI assets. Below we’ve listed several environments that should be considered depending on the complexity of the project and your organisation’s needs.

Development (aka Dev)

Being able to keep on top of the many reports you’re testing, and having the ability to track changes that occur, is essential as you get setup. Without a specific Dev environment, your production environment will quickly become overwhelmed with assets, making it hard to maintain and manage.  

When working in the dev environment, make sure that you have data sources specifically for development. We’ve seen production data used in dev on many occasions which can lead to serious privacy and data sovereignty issues. Your dev data sources shouldn’t contain sensitive data. 

These development environments can be on your local network or in cloud storage (like OneDrive for Business or GitHub). It is recommended to have separate Workspaces in Power BI Service for each environment.

Tip: The data sources of all published reports to Power BI Service must be sufficient for development use only and should avoid including confidential data.

User Acceptance Testing (aka UAT) 

The people who will be using the reports daily are the ones who should be testing them – they know the business best, and will be able to identify opportunities and gaps that the development team may not be able to identify themselves. By making sure the user is brought into the process early on, it maximises the value added to the business.

User acceptance testing is the last phase of testing. The UAT environment should only be created once the solution has been fully tested in Dev and approved by senior Power BI developers.

Continue reading “Power BI Governance, Good Practices, Part 1: Multiple Environments, Data Source Certification and Documentation”