Quick Tips: Hiding Multiple Columns in Power BI Desktop

From now on I will post some quick tips to help you accelerate your Power BI Desktop development. As the first post of these series, I explain a simple way for hiding multiple columns in Power BI Desktop. To do so:

  • Navigate to Relationships veiew in Power BI Desktop
  • Maximise the table you want to hide some columns in
  • Select the first column
  • Pres Shift and use arrow keys to highlight multiple columns
  • Here is the trick: DO NOT RIGHT CLICK! Instead, press the menu button on your keyboard. If your keyboard doesn’t have contect menu button, don’t worry, you can press Shift + F10 to do the same job

Menu key on PC Keyboard

  • Then click on “Hide in report view”

Enjoy!

Select Multiple Columns in Power BI Desktop

Time Dimension in Power BI and SSAS Tabular Model Supporting Minutes Time Bands

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Date dimension has been discussed quite a lot on the Internet and you can find lots of valuable articles around it here and there. But what if you need to analyse your data in time level? A customer has a requirement to analyse their data in Minutes level. This means that the granularity of the fact table would be at minute level. So, if they store the data in their transactional database in seconds level, then we need to aggregate that data to minutes level. I don’t want to go there, just bear in mind that the granularity of your fact table is something that you must think about at the very first steps. In most cases, if not all cases, you’d be better to have a separate Time dimension. Then you need to have a TimeID or Time column in your fact table to be able to create a relationship between the Time dimension and the fact table. In this post I show you two ways to create Time dimension in Power BI:

  • Creating Time dimension with DAX
  • Creating Time dimension with Power Query (M)

Alternatively, you can take care of the Time dimension in the source system like SQL Server. Continue reading and you’ll find a T-SQL codes as complementary.

The techniques that I explain here can be done in SSAS Tabular model and Azure Analysis Services as well.

Requirements:

To follow the steps of building the test model you need to have:

  • Power BI Desktop: Download the latest version from here
  • A sample fact table containing time or datetime. I modified FactInternetSales from AdventureWorksDW and made it available for you to download in Excel format (find the download link at the bottom of the post)

Continue reading “Time Dimension in Power BI and SSAS Tabular Model Supporting Minutes Time Bands”

DAX Measure Dependencies in SSAS Tabular and Power BI

DAX measures are the heart of every SSAS Tabular model, Power BI and Power Pivot solution. You write lots of DAX measures and you potentially reference some of them in other measures. So the number of DAX measures you write and reference them via other measures grow very quickly. Especially in complex solutions you may have hundreds of DAX measures. While your solution works perfectly, to make a minor change or adding a new measure to the solution or fixing a problem in your existing measures can be such a pain in the neck. In this post I’m going to take a step further and show you a simple way to get the whole data model dependencies then visualise the dependencies in Power BI. You can find the download link at the end of this post.

A simple search in Google brings you a bunch of useful articles talking about the subject. Some of the bests, in my mind, are as below:

In this post I use a DMV that gives us everything we want. ( Chris Webb already discussed the DMV here: Document Dependencies Between DAX Calculations). Running the DMV we can see what measures are references by other measures, what columns are referenced in the calculated columns and much more.

This is a very useful DMV that helps us getting a better understanding of the model we’re working on. We can also use this method for documentation.

How It Works

This method is fairly simple, you just need to run the following DMV on top of your SSAS Tabular model or your Power BI Desktop file and Import the results in Power BI.

SELECT * FROM $System.DISCOVER_CALC_DEPENDENCY

For Power BI you’ll need to find the local port number then you’re good to go. The only part that might not look very straightforward at first, would be finding the database in Power BI Desktop model.

An easy way, after you find the local port number of an opened Power BI Desktop file, is to find the database name from SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) when connecting to the Power BI Desktop model:

  • Open SSMS
  • Select “Analysis Services” as “Server Type”
  • Type in “localhost:PORT_NUMBER” as “Server Name” then click “Connect”

Connect to Power BI Desktop Model from SSMS

Continue reading “DAX Measure Dependencies in SSAS Tabular and Power BI”